FOTO-FINISH – FIVE SUB-2.05

HERE’S WHAT FIVE MEN FINISHING CLOSELY SUB-2.05 (IN DUBAI) LOOKS LIKE!

(NAMES BELOW)

MY THANKS TO HELMUT WINTER FOR THIS EXCELLENT STUDY.

IT IS THE FOG INCIDENTALLY WHICH IS MARRING THE PIC.

© H Winter

1 Lelisa DESISA (ETH) 2.04.45

2 Berhanu SHIFERAW (ETH) 2.04.48

3 Tadese TOLA (ETH) 2.04.49

4 Endeshaw NEGESSE (ETH) 2.04.52

5 Bernard KOECH (KEN) 2.04.53

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3 Responses to FOTO-FINISH – FIVE SUB-2.05

  1. David Cocksedge says:

    Fantastic photo, Pat! That group must have been racing together right until the last 300 metres or so. Whilst sub 2:05 times (by East Africans, mainly) have become common, the 2 hour barrier remains elusive – and I think it will remain so for many years yet. In fact, it may never be beaten. Men have yet to hold the required average pace for 90 minutes; let alone 120.
    As I have stated before, the distance (42 kilometres, 195 metres/26 miles, 385 yards) is illogical. We will see many sub 2 hour marathon if the IAAF was to change the distance back to a logical 40 kilometres, which in old money is exactly 24 miles, 1,504 yards. That was the official Olympic Marathon distance until 1908, when the London course was lengthened to accommodate British Royalty.

  2. pat says:

    dead right, Dave
    they were together with 200 metres to run
    felt a little sorry for 19 year old Shiferaw because, after a 62.39 ‘half’, he was the one who made all the running in the second half (62.06), until 42k, when Desisa took off….

    Pat

  3. tim johnston says:

    The fact that guys can run at the appropriate pace for 30k suggests that the limiting factor on a 2-hr marathon is not oxygen uptake, which (in the absence of EPO, or until the Masai start taking distance running seriously) is what is currently preventing anyone from achieving, say, a sub-26 minute 10k, or sub-12′ 30″ 5k.

    In my view there are 3 major constraints on a 2-hour marathon:

    1. Body temp., which rises as the race progresses, so the 2 hr race would have to be run on a cool, wet day.

    2. Dehydration. Even on a cool day, body loses water through breath and sweating. However much liquid you take on board, it’s difficult to aborb it quickly enough through the stomach. Blood supply to the stomach is limited by the need to service the limbs. Chemical experimentation may produce more sophisticated, readily absorbable drinks. But you really need to bypass the stomach altogether. See 3 below.

    3. Energy needs. Don’t know if anyone still uses the old Saltin/Ron Hill carbo-loading diet. It seems there are now high-energy products that make it unnecessary. But there is still the problem of getting the carbs. into the bloodstream, via the stomach.

    Solution for both 2 and 3 would be to do what pro cyclists used to do when the drug of choice was amphetamine. Back in the 1960s, Tom Simpson rode with a syringe taped to his arm under the jersey, with the needle going directly into a vein. When he needed a boost, he just gave the plunger a tap.

    Of course, there is then the question of what you put into your syringe… But it’s certainly a sensible principle: at feeding stations, instead of grabbing a bottle, you would simply replace your 150/200-mill. clip-on syringe with another. Has anyone tried it? Don’t know what the IAAF would think…

    Cheers,

    Tim J

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